Small Laws


“When you break the big laws, you do not get liberty; you do not even get anarchy. You get the small laws.”

― G.K. Chesterton

and if you don’t think GK was right better take a look around.

“Colorado’s new laws regarding recreational marijuana are grabbing national headlines, but that measure is only one of hundreds of new laws to go into effect across the

country on January 1. The Stream takes a look at a few of the noteworthy, and some unconventional, ones below.”
http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/the-stream/the-stream-officialblog/2014/1/1/12-new-and-noteworthylawstakingeffectacrosstheus.html

How bout Bloomberg’s ban on soda’s and NYC’s recent laws because of their socialist culture and the Marxist mayor they elected.
Now consider the big laws such as protecting the life of the unborn and marriage. All thrown out the window. Everywhere you turn around the rights of parents have been taken over by rule of the state.
Chesterton has been proven completely right. I’m sure you can name a dozen or better new (ridiculous)laws you’ve encountered (or know of) that the Fed or State government has passed recently. Now think about the moral laws we ought to live by that are being trampled on and thrown out the window.
We are regulated to death by the small laws as we watch the break down of civilized society.

evil takes

Feast of St Gregory of Nyssa

st gregory of nyssa
The son of two saints, Basil and Emmilia, young Gregory was raised by his older brother, St. Basil the Great, and his sister, Macrina, in modern-day Turkey. Gregory’s success in his studies suggested great things were ahead for him. After becoming a professor of rhetoric, he was persuaded to devote his learning and efforts to the Church. By then married, Gregory went on to study for the priesthood and become ordained (this at a time when celibacy was not a matter of law for priests).

He was elected Bishop of Nyssa (in Lower Armenia) in 372, a period of great tension over the Arian heresy, which denied the divinity of Christ. Briefly arrested after being falsely accused of embezzling Church funds, Gregory was restored to his see in 378, an act met with great joy by his people.

It was after the death of his beloved brother, Basil, that Gregory really came into his own. He wrote with great effectiveness against Arianism and other questionable doctrines, gaining a reputation as a defender of orthodoxy. He was sent on missions to counter other heresies and held a position of prominence at the Council of Constantinople. His fine reputation stayed with him for the remainder of his life, but over the centuries it gradually declined as the authorship of his writings became less and less certain. But, thanks to the work of scholars in the 20th century, his stature is once again appreciated. Indeed, St. Gregory of Nyssa is seen not simply as a pillar of orthodoxy but as one of the great contributors to the mystical tradition in Christian spirituality and to monasticism itself.
Source: http://www.americancatholic.org/Features/Saints/saint.aspx?id=1256

Quadrantids meteor shower peaks this weekend — where to see it – The Washington Post

The Quadrantids, which is the first meteor shower of the year, peak this weekend. Unfortunately most of the eastern half of the country will be too cloudy to catch a glimpse, but viewing is expected to be good in parts of the central and Southwest U.S. this weekend.

via Quadrantids meteor shower peaks this weekend — where to see it – The Washington Post.